What, Where, When

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What, Where, When

Broadway Box Office

Behind the Scenes with Chappaqua’s Ron Fierstein, Co-Producer of Broadway’s A Catered Affair

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ACatered Affair, a new musical featuring both book and performance by four-time Tony Award-winner Harvey Fierstein, opens April 17 on Broadway at the Walter Kerr Theatre. We chatted with Ron Fierstein, the show’s co-producer, Chappaqua resident—and brother of Harvey Ron Fierstein—about this latest Fierstein family affair.

Q: What attracted you to this project?

A: The project was my brother Harvey’s idea. I’ve looked after his business and legal affairs ever since I graduated from law school. I’ve always encouraged artists to try to have control over their projects so I encouraged Harvey to find projects that we could develop ourselves. He saw the movie A Catered Affair about ten years ago and called me and said, ‘I think this sings!’ So I went off to put the project in motion.

Q: The show focuses on a family planning a daughter’s wedding. Have you had any personal experience with this subject?

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A: Only my own wedding and it wasn’t unusual, other than the fact that when we were ready to start the ceremony, the bride and the best man still weren’t there. My wife got lost and Harvey, the best man, was late because he was performing in a matinee of Torch Song Trilogy on Broadway.

Q: In the show, your brother plays Winston, the uncle of the bride. What’s your two kids’ real Uncle Harvey like?

A: He’s very close to both of my boys and spoils them rotten. Unlike the character in the musical, however, the real Uncle Harvey has never been insulted by his family.

Q: What exactly does a co-producer of a Broadway show do?

A: It’s a very broad title. I was involved in the development of the show from day one, securing the rights, working out a legal structure with our lawyers, contracts with the book writer and composer, and all the business and legal aspects of developing the property. Some producers are actively involved in raising money; I was not, other than making a deal with Jujitasn Theaters that it be responsible for raising the six-and-a-half million dollars we needed.

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Q: Are you at all apprehensive about how Ben Brantley will review the show for the New York Times?

A: I’m hopeful that he’s going to like the show. It’s not a big song-and-dance musical. It’s a different form of musical theater where the music is fully integrated into the drama and comedy of the story. It’s ninety-seven minutes long and there’s no intermission. As they say, ‘You’ll laugh, you’ll cry, and you’ll be home by ten.’

 //  Laurie Yarnell

 

Home Theater

What to add to your Netflix queue this month

 

Before the Devil Knows You’re Dead 

DVD Release Date: April 15, Image Entertainment/Think Film

Last year was a banner one for films with a crushingly pessimistic outlook on life, and this gritty crime drama from Sidney Lumet is no exception. The movie centers on down-on-their-luck brothers Hank and Andy, who hatch a scheme to get some quick money by robbing a jewelry store. But it’s not just any store: it’s a boutique in suburban Westchester (but of course), and it belongs to Hank and Andy’s parents (bad idea). They lose control of the operation, and set into motion a chain of events that, like the rest of the great movies last year, is blisteringly bleak.

 

Walk Hard: The Dewey Cox Story

DVD Release Date: April 8, Sony Pictures

Be it Ray, Beyond the Sea, De-Lovely, or Walk the Line, if you’ve seen one musician’s film biography, you’ve seen them all. Except this one: the legendary (if fictional) Dewey Cox collects all of the rock-doc clichés—from drug abuse to siring scads of illegitimate children—for a lovingly goofy parody of the whole genre. Even the music, written by real industry vets like Dan Bern, Mike Viola, and Marshall Crenshaw, manages to simultaneously put the greats like Bob Dylan and Brian Wilson up on a pedestal while taking them all down a peg.

 

The Golden Compass

DVD Release Date: April 29, New Line Home Video

Daemons and alethiometers and armored bears: Oh my! Everyone—child or not—should get their hands on Philip Pullman’s trilogy of truly fascinating fantasy novels (you can read them in a weekend). The story centers on spunky heroine Lyra, who sets off on a journey to take down the ruling establishment in an alternate-reality version of London inhabited by witches, evil scholars, and strange scientific truth-telling instruments. Once you’re finished with the novels, Chris Weitz’s film adaptation does a more than solid job of visually capturing a world more that’s much more imaginative than Hogwarts—and twice as sinister.

 //  ML

 

Art

Westchester

Ongoing through April 12: Pot Shots at Hot Shots. Artists take aim at the superstars in the art world and poke fun at their most popular works. 3rd Rail Studio, New Rochelle (914-712-9831; 3rd railstudio.com).

Ongoing through April 12: She. Active members of the Mamaroneck Artist’s Guild create work to honor Women’s History Month. The Mamaroneck Artists’ Guild, Larchmont, (914-834-1117; mamaroneck artistsguild.org).

Ongoing through April 13: Person of the Crowd: The Contemporary Art of Flânerie. Avant-garde artists create multimedia art about postmodern cities and the people who inhabit them. Artists include Charles LaBelle, Lee Mingwei, and many others. The Neuberger Museum of Art, Purchase (914-251-6100; neuberger.org).

Ongoing through April 16: Patterns. Artists Francis Dosne, Ann Ladd Ferencz, Missy Lipsett, Gail Resen, and Tina Roherer show artwork that emphasize patterns to create images reminiscent of patchwork quilts. The White Plains Public Library, White Plains (914-422-1480; wppl.lib.ny.us).

Ongoing through April 16: Set in Stone. Organized by folklorist Tom Van Buren, the exhibition showcases the art of stonework, wall-building, and stone-carving as it is practiced in construction and landscape architecture in and around the county. The Westchester Arts Council, White Plains (914-428-4220; westarts.com).

Ongoing through April 19: Animalia Anima. Emerging and established printmakers display works that use animals in their imagery. The Pelham Art Center, Pelham (914-738-2525; pelhamartcenter.org).

Ongoing through April 19: Robert Larson: Works on Paper. A showing of small works on paper by Santa Cruz-based artist Robert Larson. Eyebuzz Fine Art, Tarrytown (914-631-1080; eyebuzz.com).

Ongoing through April 19: Street Life. Artist Laurentz Thurn displays his recent paintings. Secrets Fine Arts Gallery, Hastings-on-Hudson (914-478-2101; secretsonhastings.com).

Ongoing through May 4: Super Objects: Super Comfort for Super People. The Neuberger displays prints and archival footage of choreographer Merce Cunningham’s collaborations with artists including John Cage, Jasper Johns, Robert Morris, Bruce Nauman, Andy Warhol, and others. The Neuberger Museum of Art, Purchase (914-251-6100; neuberger.org).

Ongoing through May 31: Red Grooms: In the Studio. The Hudson River Museum traces the evolution and creation pop artist Red Grooms’s large-scale works, including the Museum’s commission, The Bookstore. The Hudson River Museum, Yonkers (914-963-4550; hrm.org).

Ongoing through June 1: Off the Grid. Contemporary artists make socially and ecologically responsible art by using accessible and sustainable materials. The Neuberger Museum of Art, Purchase (914-251-6100; neuberger.org).

Ongoing through June 29: Here’s the Thing. The exhibition features more than 60 single-object still-life paintings, drawings, sculptures, and prints from artists including Jasper Johns, Andy Warhol, Roy Lichtenstein, and Claes Oldenburg. The Katonah Museum of Art, Katonah (914-232-9555; katonahmuseum.org).

Ongoing through July 27: Size Matters: XXL. Artists including Jonathan Meese, Toba Khedoori, Tim Eitel, Neo Rauch, Uwe Kowski, and others display their large-scale, monumental works. The Hudson Valley Center for Contemporary Art, Peekskill (914-788-0100; hvcca.com).

April 9 to May 3: Francine Turk: Gestures. The Chicago-based artist shows her exquisite nudes rendered in charcoal. Anelle Gandelman Fine Art, Larchmont (914-840-4151; anellegandelman.com).

Nearby

Ongoing through April 20: Robotics. Families are encouraged to tour a hands-on exhibit that traces the roles of robots in science, technology, and popular culture. The Bruce Museum of Arts and Science, Greenwich, CT (203-869-0376; bruce museum.org).

Ongoing through April 24: Robert Kaupelis: A Retrospective. Large-scale, colorful works are culled from Robert Kaupelis’s 100 exhibitions and 65 solo shows for this retrospective. The Flinn Gallery, Greenwich Library, Greenwich, CT (203-622-7947; flinngallery.com).

Ongoing through May 30: An Art Trio: Patch, Pile, and Proof. Three artists tackle the same subject—abstract art—from three different directions. Blue Hill Art and Cultural Center, Pearl River (845-359-1584).

Ongoing through July 6: 20th Century American Prints from the Bruce Museum Collection. Childe Hassam, Donald Freeman, Alexander Calder, and Romare Bearden are among the artists included in this exhibition of 27 fine art prints. The Bruce Museum of Arts and Science, Greenwich, CT (203-869-0376; brucemuseum.org).

Ongoing through July 27: Painting the Glass House: Artists Revisit Modern Architecture. Sixteen artists create works that comment on the period of modern architecture generally identified with buildings by Philip Johnson, Frank Lloyd Wright, and Mies van der Rohe. The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum, Ridgefield, CT (203-438-4519; aldrichart.org).

Ongoing through August 17: Architecture of the Imagination: The Lure of the LEGO® Brick. Artists Nathan Sawaya creates large- and small-scale sculptures using only standard LEGO® pieces. The Stamford Museum and Nature Center, Stamford, CT (203-322-1646; stamfordmuseum.org).

Ongoing through August 31: Gary Panter: Daydream Trap. Artist Gary Panter’s sketchbooks, paintings, and music are showcased at the museum in his first solo exhibition. The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum, Ridgefield, CT (203-438-4519; aldrichart.org).

Ongoing through September 30: An-My Lê: Trap Rock. Photographer Lê displays a series of 22 photographs of a basalt quarry on the Hudson River. Dia:Beacon, Beacon, NY (845-440-0100; diabeacon.org).

Ongoing through September 30: Sol LeWitt: Drawing Series. The museum presents 14 of LeWitt’s key works from the late 1960s to the mid-1970s. Dia:Beacon, Beacon, NY (845-440-0100; diabeacon.org).

Ongoing through November 30: Phenomenal Weather. Visitors can use hands-on exhibits to learn about the science behind wind, rain, snow, and extreme events like hurricanes. The Bruce Museum of Arts and Science, Greenwich, CT (203-869-0376; brucemuseum.org).

April 1 to August 17: From Harbor to Haven. Art collectors and Greenwich residents Dave and Reba Williams loan the HSTG 60 original prints that focus on Connecticut, including works from artists Childe Hassam, Alexander Calder, and Jasper Johns. Historical Society of the Town of Greenwich, Bush-Holley Historic Site, Cos Cob, CT (203-869-6899; hstg.org).

 

Film

Westchester

April 1: Talk Cinema. Film writer Harlan Jacobson previews a yet-to-be-released film and hosts a discussion afterward with a filmmaker involved. The Performing Arts Center, Purchase College, Purchase (914-251-6200; artscenter.org).

 

April 1: Refusenik. A screening of the film followed by a Q&A with David Harris, executive director of the American Jewish Committee. Jacob Burns Film Center, Pleasantville (914-747-5555; burnsfilmcenter.org).

 

April 1: Steal a Pencil For Me. A screening of a documentary about Jack and Ina Polak, who live in Eastchester. Jacob Burns Film Center, Pleasantville (914-747-5555; burnsfilmcenter.org).

 

April 2, 5: The Champagne Spy. A screening of the film, followed on April 2 by a Q&A with Eran Lerman, executive director of the American Jewish Committee Israel/Middle East office in Jerusalem. Jacob Burns Film Center, Pleasantville (914-747-5555; burnsfilmcenter.org).

 

April 2: Black Over White. A screening of the film as part of the Jacob Burns Center’s “Westchester Celebrates Jewish Film 2008” series. Jacob Burns Film Center, Pleasantville (914-747-5555; burnsfilmcenter.org).

 

April 3: Six Days. A screening of the film as part of the Jacob Burns Center’s “Westchester Celebrates Jewish Film 2008” series. Jacob Burns Film Center, Pleasantville (914-747-5555; burnsfilm center.org).

 

April 3, 6: Praying with Lior. A screening of the film with a pre-movie reception and post-film Q&A with film subject Lior, his stepmother Lynne Iser, and Jewish Week publisher Gary Rosenblatt on April 6. Jacob Burns Film Center, Pleasantville (914-747-5555; burnsfilmcenter.org).

 

April 4, 6: Last Year at Marienbad. A screening of the film as part of the Jacob Burns Film Center’s special programming. Jacob Burns Film Center, Pleasantville (914-747-5555; burnsfilmcenter.org).

 

April 5: The Paragon Orchestra’s “Clown Princes.” The Paragon Orchestra provides the original scores to the films of Charlie Chaplin, Buster Keaton, and Harold Lloyd. Paramount Center for the Arts, 1008 Brown St, Peekskill (914-739-2333; paramountcenter.org).

 

April 5, 6: The Shaggy Dog. A noontime screening of the family-friendly film. Jacob Burns Film Center, Pleasantville (914-747-5555; burnsfilmcenter.org).

 

April 5, 6: The Year My Parents Went on Vacation. A screening of the film as part of the Jacob Burns Center’s “Westchester Celebrates Jewish Film 2008” series. Jacob Burns Film Center, Pleasantville (914-747-5555; burnsfilmcenter.org).

 

April 5, 7: Jellyfish. A screening of the film as part of the Jacob Burns Center’s “Westchester Celebrates Jewish Film 2008” series. Jacob Burns Film Center, Pleasantville (914-747-5555; burnsfilm center.org).

 

April 5, 8: Sweet Mud. A screening of the film as part of the Jacob Burns Center’s “Westchester Celebrates Jewish Film 2008” series. Jacob Burns Film Center, Pleasantville (914-747-5555; burnsfilm center.org).

 

April 6, 7: Aviva My Love. A screening of the film as part of the Jacob Burns Center’s “Westchester Celebrates Jewish Film 2008” series. Jacob Burns Film Center, Pleasantville (914-747-5555; burnsfilm center.org).

 

April 9: The Golem. A screening of the film with a live performance by the BQE Project and prize-winning author/translator Curt Leviant. Jacob Burns Film Center, Pleasantville (914-747-5555; burnsfilmcenter.org).

 

April 10, 12: Rabin-Peres: Everything is Personal. A screening of the film followed on April 10 by a Q&A with Steven Bayme, director of the Contemporary Jewish Life department of the American Jewish Committee. Jacob Burns Film Center, Pleasantville (914-747-5555; burnsfilmcenter.org).

 

April 11: Avenue Montaigne. Film professor Bill Costanzo presents a series of foreign films with introductions, program notes, and discussions. Westchester Community College, 75 Grasslands Rd, Valhalla (914-606-6700; sunywcc.edu).

 

April 11: Pete Seeger: The Power of Song. A one-night-only screening of the documentary about the musician. Jacob Burns Film Center, Pleasantville (914-747-5555; burnsfilmcenter.org).

 

April 12, 14: Beaufort. A screening of the film as part of the Jacob Burns Center’s “Westchester Celebrates Jewish Film 2008” series. Jacob Burns Film Center, Pleasantville (914-747-5555; burnsfilm center.org).

 

April 12, 14: Heartbeat Detector. A screening of the film as part of the Jacob Burns Center’s “Westchester Celebrates Jewish Film 2008” series. Jacob Burns Film Center, Pleasantville (914-747-5555; burnsfilmcenter.org).

 

April 12, 15: My Father the Lord. A screening of the film as part of the Jacob Burns Center’s “Westchester Celebrates Jewish Film 2008” series. Jacob Burns Film Center, Pleasantville (914-747-5555; burnsfilmcenter.org).

 

April 12, 13, 26, 27: The Swiss Family Robinson. A noontime screening of the family-friendly film. Jacob Burns Film Center, Pleasantville (914-747-5555; burnsfilmcenter.org).

 

April 13, 15: Sixty-Six. A screening of the film as part of the Jacob Burns Center’s “Westchester Celebrates Jewish Film 2008” series. Jacob Burns Film Center, Pleasantville (914-747-5555; burnsfilm center.org).

 

April 13, 16: Children of the Sun. A screening of the film followed on April 16 by a Q&A with Yoel Magid, executive director of the Westchester Reform Temple, and Naomi and Jeff Cohen, who grew up in a Children’s House on s kibbutz. Jacob Burns Film Center, Pleasantville (914-747-5555; burnsfilmcenter.org).

 

April 13, 17: The Unknown Soldier. A screening of the film as part of the Jacob Burns Center’s “Westchester Celebrates Jewish Film 2008” series. Jacob Burns Film Center, Pleasantville (914-747-5555; burnsfilmcenter.org).

 

April 16, 30: Objects on Film. Film editor Andy Keir screens films focused on a single object to complement the Here’s the Thing exhibition. The Katonah Museum of Art, Rte 22 at Jay St, Katonah (914-232-9555; katonahmuseum.org).

 

April 18: After the Wedding. Film professor Bill Costanzo presents a series of foreign films with introductions, program notes, and discussions. Westchester Community College, 75 Grasslands Rd, Valhalla (914-606-6700; sunywcc.edu).

 

April 19, 20: The Red Balloon and White Mane. A noon-time screening of the family-friendly films. Jacob Burns Film Center, Pleasantville (914-747-5555; burnsfilmcenter.org).

 

April 24: animation festival. A screening of the best of the Ottawa Animation Festival 2007. Jacob Burns Film Center, Pleasantville (914-747-5555; burnsfilmcenter.org).

 

April 27: Profound Desire of the Gods. Jonathan Demme, director of Silence of the Lambs screens the strange, wild, outrageous, and forgotten films, then leads a discussion afterward. Jacob Burns Film Center, Pleasantville (914-747-5555; burnsfilmcenter.org).

 

April 28: Spirit of the Marathon. A screening of the film followed by a Q&A with author and marathoner Ben Cheever and filmmakers Jon Dunham and Gwendolen Twist. Jacob Burns Film Center, Pleasantville (914-747-5555; burnsfilmcenter.org).

 

April 29: Plagues and Pleasures of the Sea. A screening of the film followed by a Q&A with filmmaker Chris Metzler. Jacob Burns Film Center, Pleasantville (914-747-5555; burnsfilmcenter.org).

 

April 30: Beauty Mark. A screening of the female-centric movie as part of the ongoing “Celebrating Women Filmmakers” series. Jacob Burns Film Center, Pleasantville (914-747-5555; burnsfilmcenter.org).

 Nearby

April 7: Gold Diggers of 1933. The Greenwich Classic Film Series presents a screening of the film, followed by a discussion with Turner Classic Movies host Richard Barrios. Crown Plaza Movie Theater, Greenwich, CT (914-725-0999).

 

April 13: Movie Marathon with a Ridgefield Twist. In honor of Ridgefield’s 300th anniversary, the Playhouse is hosting a marathon of films with a connection to the town, including Godspell, Torch Song Trilogy, and Amazing Journey: The Story of the Who, with prices determined by year of release. Ridgefield Playhouse, Ridgefield, CT (203-438-5795; ridgefield playhouse.org).

 

April 14: Double Indemnity. The Greenwich Classic Film Series presents a screening of the film, followed by a discussion with film historian Foster Hirsch, author of The Dark Side of the Screen: Film Noir. Crown Plaza Movie Theater, Greenwich, CT (914-725-0999).

 

Music CLASSICAL & OPERA

Westchester

April 1: Piano Trio. The Chaminade Music Club presents sisters Sakiko, Mimi, and Harymi Furuya playing pieces by Mendelssohn and Schubert. Yonkers Library, Grinton I. Will Branch, Yonkers (965-5232).

 

April 2: A Nordic Tapestry. Swedish-American soprano Elly Erickson and pianist Craig Ketter perform Scandanavian songs in a free, noontime concert. Downtown Music, White Plains (914-949-0384; dtmusic.org).

 

April 5, 6: The Westchester Philharmonic. The Philharmonic presents a program that includes a world premiere commission by Westchester composer Laura Kaminsky, as well as works by Mozart and Dvorák. The Performing Arts Center, Purchase College, Purchase (914-682-3707; westchesterphil.org).

 

April 5: Ying Quartet. Guest cellist Steven Doane joins Timothy, Janet, Phillip, and David Ying in works by Schubert, Haydn, and Chinese-American composers. Pleasantville High School, Pleasantville (914-271-2465).

 

April 6: The Chappaqua Chamber Series. The Chappaqua Chamber Series presents Paul Bonnel and friends in a concert featuring works by Schubert and Barber, followed by a reception. The Chappaqua Library Auditorium, Chappaqua (914-921-4642; chappaquaorchestra.org).

 

April 9: Kaiku. A free, noontime performance of music from Finland by Jaana Kantola, Paula Jaakola, and friends. Downtown Music, White Plains (914-949-0384; dtmusic.org).

 

April 12: Wind, Tempests, and Nature’s Fury. Ars Antiqua presents a program of baroque operatic selections that feature sounds of wind, thunder, and rain, followed by a buffet of artisanal cheeses. Church of St. Mary the Virgin, Chappaqua (914-238-8015; ars-antiqua.org).

 

April 13: String Quartets for Singles. The Amadeus Conservatory hosts a quartet performance of works by Brahms and Schubert, followed by a wine-tasting for single adults who love the arts. At St. Matthew’s Church, Bedford (914-238-0388; amadeusconservatory.com).

 

April 13: Paul Jacobs Organ Recital. Jacobs, head of the Department of Organ at Julliard, performs selections from his far-ranging repertoire at the Union Church. Union Church, Pocantico Hills (914-631-8200; husdsonvalley.org).

 

April 16: Go for Baroque. A free, noontime performance of baroque music by Margaret Siemnicka and Jean Newton of the Music Conservatory of Westchester. Downtown Music, White Plains (914-949-0384; dtmusic.org).

April 20: Andy Lamy, Clarinet, & Friends. A performance by Lamy and friends that includes recordings of African birds playe

Our Healthcare Heroes Awards event takes place on May 9!

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