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Take a Short Trip Down Billionaire's Dirt Road in North Salem

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At first blush, the Vail Lane sector in North Salem appears to be just another backwater country tract — yet it is so much more. Take a short trip with us, to see why this hidden Westchester gem known as Billionaire’s Dirt Road is so unique.

Vail Lane

126: This 10.48-acre property is home to Mitchell “Mitch” Slater. Slater is most commonly known for his position as former COO of Core Media Group and involvement with American Idol.

186: Finch Farm is a horse farm owned by Larry Fink, CEO of multinational investment company BlackRock. The property had been owned by actor Stanley Tucci until 2004. Coincidentally, the word “Finch” translates to Fink in German. Perhaps it was kismet.

Norton Road

80: Philanthropist RonaldStanton owned this property, named MontEngraisFarms, until his death in 2016. Stanton was the founder of petrochemicals companyTransammoniaInc.

The Stanton Property

Following the 2016 death of businessman Ronald Stanton, 371 acres of his land were purchased by JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon, Larry Fink, and financier Steve Rattner, who collectively opened the land for exclusive use by the North Salem Bridle Trails Association, which anyone can join for a relatively nominal fee. This acreage is also a preserve for the endangered Bobolink birds.

Titicus Road

258: This sleepy road made headlines in November 2015 with the murder of socialite Lois Colley in her home. She was married to Eugene Colley, owner of more than 100 McDonald’s franchises. Two years later, the murder remains unsolved.

706: Steve Rattner owns this property, too. Rattner was the lead advisor to the Presidential Task Force on the Auto Industry during the Obama administration and is the chairman of Willet Advisors.

741: Known as Gotham North, this is the horse farm of Georgina Bloomberg, daughter of media mogul and former NYC mayor Michael Bloomberg. The perimeter stone walls, as well as adjacent properties on Route 116, were built by elephants that belonged to the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus, back in the 1800s. The circus group used to escape the harsh Florida summer heat and relocate to North Salem for the season. There is even a road on the property called Elephant Walk, which was used to usher the animals from the pastures to the performance sites.