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Health & Wellness: Boost your well-being with expert tips

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Staying healthy and in shape can be especially challenging through the winter months when the tendency is to move less and hibernate. Westchester’s health and wellness experts are ready to help you meet that challenge, so you can emerge from winter mentally and physically stronger than ever.

Staying healthy through flu season: ArchCare at Providence Rest Nursing Home

Q. How should older adults prepare to stay healthy this fall?

A. The cooler weather is a signal that fall is here, which also means that we have entered the influenza or “flu” season. Influenza is a contagious respiratory infection caused by the influenza viruses that infect the nose, throat, and sometimes the lungs. It can cause mild to severe illness, and at times, can lead to death. People who have the flu often experience symptoms such as fever, chills, cough, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, muscle or body aches, headaches, and fatigue. Some people may also experience vomiting and diarrhea.

While each flu season differs in severity, during most seasons, people 65 years and older bear the greatest burden of disease. The CDC estimates that between 70-85% of seasonal flu-related deaths and between 50-70% of seasonal flu-related hospitalizations occurred among older adults. Adults above the age of 65 years are at higher risk of developing serious complications from flu compared to younger adults. This increased risk is due in part to declines in immune responses with age.

This season, with COVID-19 an ongoing threat, the best way to reduce your risk from flu and possibly serious complications is to get the influenza vaccine, aka the flu shot. People who have had the COVID-19 booster/vaccine or are planning to get vaccinated against COVID-19 can also safely get the flu shot. You can get both the seasonal flu shot and updated COVID-19 boosters, i.e., the bivalent booster, at your local doctor’s offices and pharmacies now. These can be given at the same visit and will help protect you from Influenza and COVID-19.

Q. My loved one needs to be in an assisted living or nursing home. What should I look for to ensure they stay healthy this season?

A. For seniors who require an assisted living or nursing home, it is wise to take extra precautions during the fall and winter months. For example, at ArchCare, the Archdiocese of New York’s healthcare system that every day cares for more than 9,000 seniors, the poor. and persons with special needs, we have invested in a robust infection prevention program that includes state-of-the-art technology (e.g. ultraviolet filters in main vents across our facilities to constantly disinfect the air), a team of infection prevention professionals, and a central command structure that helps to ensure the highest level of safety across our nursing home residences and programs. We also offer flu shots, COVID vaccines and boosters to all nursing home residents. These efforts and more enable us to keep the seniors we serve safe year-round, but particularly during the flu season and the ongoing management of COVID-19.

ArchCare at Providence Rest Nursing Home
3304 Waterbury Ave
Bronx, NY
718.931.3000
www.providencerest.org

Building a healthy routine this fall: A Better Body by Steve

Q. My days are becoming more routine now that everyone’s kids are back at school. I want to improve my health. Where do I start?

A. Create healthy habits that become part of your routine:

  • Schedule a weekly hike or bike with a friend.
  • Prep breakfast at night, so you have more time in the mornings to eat.
  • Take a short walk at lunch.
  • Keep fruit, nuts, or a tuna pouch at work in case you miss lunch.

Try to keep your adjustments small so they STICK and become part of a healthier lifestyle.

Want more ideas? Go to aBetterBodybySteve.com/fall2022 for more!

Steve Schlenkermann
A Better Body by Steve
Virtual personal training and
personalized nutritional coaching
914.447.5894
www.aBetterBodyBySteve.com

Understanding the difference between traditional and CEREC® crowns: The Center for Cosmetic Dentistry

Q. What’s the difference between traditional and CEREC® crowns?

A. Traditional crowns and CEREC® crowns both have the same basic purpose. They are durable tooth restorations custom-designed to reinforce a compromised tooth and prevent further deterioration, while simultaneously improving function and aesthetics. With that in mind, the process of creating a traditional dental crown is typically quite different when compared to a CEREC® crown. A traditional crown may require a putty dental impression to form the foundational blueprint for its creation and are usually sent to an outside dental laboratory to be manufactured. CEREC® same-day crowns can achieve virtually the same results as traditional crowns but at a much faster rate. With CEREC® technology, the entire process can be expedited because the crowns are made right here in the office. The dental impression, the creation of the permanent crown, and placement of the crown on the tooth can be done in a single appointment. With CEREC®, the impression is created digitally—no messy putties are necessary—which makes this part of the process much quicker and more comfortable.

Robert L. Rioseco, DMD, FAGD, AAACD
The Center for Cosmetic Dentistry
147 Underhill Ave
West Harrison
914.761.8229
www.zendentist.com

Providing supportive psychiatric treatment: Juan A. Rivolta, MD, PLLC

Q. Are your psychiatric services available to both children and adults?

A. The private practice of Juan A. Rivolta, MD offers supportive/psychodynamic psychotherapy and medication management to children and adults suffering from different psychiatric disorders. It has the ultimate goal of providing patients the time and attention they need in a safe and compassionate environment. Dr. Rivolta completed his general psychiatry residency at BronxCare/Mount Sinai, and his Child & Adolescent Psychiatry Fellowship at Westchester Medical Center/New York Medical College. Dr. Rivolta is Board-Certified in both Adult and Child & Adolescent Psychiatry.

Juan A. Rivolta, MD, PLLC
Child & Adult Psychiatry
411 Theodore Fremd Ave, Suite 206
Rye
914.714.4776
www.juanrivoltapsychiatry.com 

Prepping for cold and flu season: Scarsdale Medical Group

Q. What advice would you give to stay healthy this cold and flu season?

A. Many patients have postponed preventive care due to the pandemic and are just getting back to regular appointments. The first step in protecting your immunity is to get up to date on your vaccinations. In addition to being vaccinated against COVID-19, vaccination against the flu and shingles, as well as a Tdap (tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis) booster is important. You probably had the Tdap as a child, but the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends that adults get a booster every 10 years.

Q. How else can patients boost their immunity?

A. Get plenty of sleep, avoid smoking, and establish a regular exercise routine. Enjoying the outdoors also supports your immune system, as sunshine is a good source of vitamin D. In addition, regularly washing your hands is one of the easiest ways to prevent the spread of germs.

Q. Which other vitamins or minerals support the immune system?

A. Vitamin C helps heal wounds and repair and maintain healthy bones, teeth, skin, and cartilage. Since it is not naturally produced by the body, you can boost your intake of vitamin C by eating most fruits and vegetables. Garlic also has antibiotic properties that are effective in fighting a varied range of bacteria, fungi, and viruses. Zinc can help control infections by slowing down the immune response, preventing runaway inflammation. Calcium can, in some cases, drive the body’s reaction to invading organisms, and decrease that reaction down as the infection wanes. Before starting the use of any supplements, consult your physician, as they may have specific recommendations based on your unique health needs.

To make an appointment with Dr. Finkelstein, call 914.723.8100 or request one online at scarsdalemedical.com.

Michael Finkelstein, MD
Board-Certified in Internal Medicine and Wound Care
Scarsdale Medical Group
600 Mamaroneck Ave
Harrison
914.723.8100
www.scarsdalemedical.com

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