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New York Medical College Unveils a Groundbreaking Nanotech Bandage System

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Karola Warsinsky | AdobeStock

Though resembling an ordinary bandage, the new product actually helps heal patients faster, for cheap.

Alan Kadish, President of New York Medical College (NYMC) and Touro College and University System (TCUS) announced the issuance of a patent by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office for StatVac™, a revolutionary advancement in bandages that utilizes Nano technology to accelerate the healing process.

This new technology, developed by Donald Spector at the BioInc@NYMC medical incubator program, a renowned inventor with hundreds of patents in medicine, technology, consumer products and more, releases antibiotics, antiseptics, and other pathogen killing ingredients while drawing out dead material and secretions from the wound itself.


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“This new technology will be made available to the general public, as well as physicians and hospitals as a low-cost bandage to help accelerate healing, even in difficult situations,” says Dr. Kadish.

The StatVac™ appears and is just as thin as an ordinary bandage, but the nano-cells within its gauze layer draw out the moisture from a wound, thus quickening the healing process by cleansing and drying the area while medication is administered.


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Currently, hospitals typically use the world-famous V.A.C. System, which contains motors and other external mechanisms to create suction and accelerate healing. The StatVac™ revolutionizes this process by replicating it within a completely self-contained unit, all while maintaining the size and appearance of a typical bandage.

“We are excited by this new technology and hope that it will serve to bring these new state-of-the-art healing bandages to the public, physician’s offices, hospitals, and emergency areas that would not normally have access to this type of wound care, saving lives around the world,” says Lisa Pamintuan, director of Technology Business Development at TCUS.