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Croton’s Great Jack O’Lantern Blaze: Everything You Need to Know

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Photos courtesy of Historic Hudson Valley

Your complete guide to one of the biggest annual events of the Halloween season.

Ask anyone from the Hudson Valley to Manhattan, the annual Great Jack O’Lantern Blaze in Croton-on-Hudson is one of the largest must-hit cultural events of the season. Locals, celebrities, everyone comes out year after year to see the massive light sculptures constructed from thousands of carved pumpkins.

Here’s everything you need to know about the spectacle, including its history, how it works, where to get tickets, and — of course — some truly epic shots to get you primed for your next visit.

What Is It?

The Great Jack O’Lantern Blaze — often just called “the Pumpkin Blaze” or “the Blaze” by locals in the know — is an annual event held at Van Cortlandt Manor in Croton-on-Hudson by Historic Hudson Valley, a local not-for-profit historical preservation society, which also holds several other Halloween events in Tarrytown, Sleepy Hollow, and throughout Westchester County.

Originally started as a local celebration in 2005, the Blaze has swelled in popularity over the years, topping more than 160,000 visitors in recent years, and adding a Long Island iteration at the Old Bethpage Village Restoration Site in 2020.

Each Blaze features intricate light sculptures and landscapes built entirely from lit, ornately carved pumpkins. Fan favorites like the Headless Horseman, Statue of Liberty, pumpkin planetarium, and the “Pumpkin Zee Bridge” are reconstructed yearly from the gourds (as well as longer-lasting artificial “Funkins”), along with a rotating assortment of new designs. The recent additions of a sea serpent and gallery of pumpkin-y masterpieces have both proved popular.

Photo by Dave Zucker

The walking tour, which typically lasts about 45 minutes or so, depending on your pace and where you stop for photos, also includes a working pumpkin carousel designed by William Dentzel, a modern-day descendant of one of this country’s very first carousel makers. (Try overlaying it with Richard Christy’s fabulous two-volume Blaze: The Soundtrack and thank us later.)

“The pumpkin sort of tells you what it wants to be,” says Historic Hudson Valley VP of Communications and Commerce Rob Schweitzer. “It may not be the perfect pumpkin for this idea I have in mind, but the pumpkin might have another idea and you end up carving that.”

All that carving starts early with plenty of local volunteers. “We really start in earnest the end of August with carving Funkins,” Schweitzer says, “then we’re carving real pumpkins throughout the run of the event, because we’re replacing about a thousand pumpkins every week.” That’s a lot of seeds and guts. (Don’t worry, though: Gourdish entrails, carved scraps, and “retired” pumpkins are all composted for the gardens at Historic Hudson Valley sites throughout the region.)

Guests can also select from an incredibly diverse assortment of pumpkin and pumpkin themed and Halloween-y items in the Blaze gift shop. Delicious food like popcorn and fresh cider donuts pair nicely with beer, wine, and soft drinks, available at the entrance/exit.

Courtesy of Historic Hudson Valley

How to Get Tickets — How It Works

Tickets are available online for scheduled dates and times, staggered every 30 minutes or so to ensure a steady flow of guests in and out. Tickets start at $24 depending on admission time. Senior and student ID discounts are also available, and Historic Hudson Valley members and children under 3 always get in free. (There’s also a $2 surcharge for phone purchases.)

The Blaze is rain-or-shine, though definitely prepare to get muddy if the former holds true; a good set of mud boots may be advisable.

This year, the Blaze runs daily from September 18 through November 1, and then will continue on a Friday-Sunday schedule through November 21.

What’s New This Year

2020 marks some big changes for the Blaze, both in terms of attractions and procedures. A new, more detailed Headless Horseman and a coven of witches around their bubbling cauldron lead the pack, along with an homage to Hansel & Gretel and heroic firefighters rescuing a cat.

Also launched this year, Blaze: Long Island brings the fun of the Van Cortlandt Manor out to our southeasterly neighbors. Locals will get their own versions of our favorites, as well as a few regional originals like a lighthouse and (apparently is was developed on Long Island!) lunar module.

COVID-19 Restrictions

Unfortunately, the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has also forced the addition and deletion of a few elements this year. Classified as a “low risk” outdoor and entirely touchless experience, the Blaze will reduce capacity by 67% in each scheduled session, with capacity and social distancing strictly enforced (even for members, who can normally attend any showing unticketed).

Guests must agree to a COVID Courtesy Code and everyone over the age of 2 will be required to wear a mask, including staff. Plexiglass shielding will also be installed at ticket scanners, while bathrooms will continuously be rotated in and out of service for cleaning. Unfortunately, for everyone’s safety no food or beverage will be available this year.

On-site ticket sales will also be unavailable this year, meaning tickets must be purchased in advance and for a designated time slot. Tickets can however be exchanged for the first time this year, up to 72 hours in advance, for a $2 per ticket exchange fee.

Okay, Now Shut Up and Show Me the Photos!

Thought you’d never ask.

No no, that’s not weirdly terrifying in the slightest. Nope. Uh-uh. | Courtesy Historic Hudson Valley

“My lord.” | Photo by Dave Zucker

Nature finds a way. | Photo by Dave Zucker

Photo by Dave Zucker

Photo by Dave Zucker

Photo by Dave Zucker

Photo by Dave Zucker

Photo by Dave Zucker

Photo by Dave Zucker

The musically animated pumpkin planetarium | Photo by Dave Zucker

Photo by Dave Zucker

Photo by Dave Zucker

Photo by Dave Zucker

Photo by Dave Zucker

“Cuz it’s THRILLERRRRR thriller niiight….” | Photo by Dave Zucker

The fabled unipegacorn | Photo by Dave Zucker

“Well. I. NEVER.” | Photo by Dave Zucker

You can really see the Dutch influences. | Photo by Dave Zucker

Photo by Dave Zucker

Photo by Dave Zucker

Photo by Kate Chervin

Photo by Kate Chervin

Photo by Kate Chervin

Photo by Kate Chervin

Photo by Kate Chervin

Photo by Kate Chervin

Photo by Kate Chervin

Photo by Kate Chervin

Photo by Kate Chervin

Photo by Kate Chervin

Will I Get to See Celebrities at the Blaze?

Probably! (Possibly.)