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White Plains Council Approves a New Senior Residential Community

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Image courtesy of MPFP

Westchester County’s former Good Counsel campus will transform into a community that provides senior and multi-family housing.

In recent years, White Plains has been booming with developmental projects that have brought economic and communal benefits to the city best known for its diverse range of restaurants and shopping centers.

In March, the White Plains Common Council furthered this initiative by unanimously voting to approve the redevelopment of the former Good Counsel school campus at 52 North Broadway. The project will allow for the construction of 335 independent and assisted living apartments for seniors, 28 townhouses, and 48 multi-family apartments on the 16-acre property.

The decision closes a five-year review under the State Environmental Quality Review Act (SEQRA), establishes a Planned Residential Development (PRD) Zoning District for the site allowing for the mixed residential uses, and approves a master plan initiating the conceptual development program for the property.

The authorized plan is in full compliance with State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) requirements. Specific elements of the proposal include the historic preservation of the Mapleton House and the west wing of the former convent that faces North Broadway. The Chapel of Divine Compassion will also be maintained for ongoing use.

Additional components of the project include access to the 2.3-acre front lawn of the campus facing North Broadway, a decrease in the number of parking spaces from 655 to 450 to reduce traffic, and a maximum building height of 85 feet to preserve the skyline.

Since its purchase in 2015 by the current owner, WP Development NB LLC, the property has been on the tax rolls, generating significant revenue for White Plains. Once the proposed residential community is developed, it is expected to provide substantial additional tax revenues to the City of White Plains and its school district.

The next steps for the Westchester County project include a detailed site plan review by the city and the Historic Preservation Commission.