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Best Places to Live: Central Port Chester

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Blueprint: In 1660, three settlers from Greenwidge (now Greenwich, CT) purchased Manursing Island and the land near the Byram River from the Mohegan Indians. The area incorporated into the village of Port Chester in 1868 and was considered a major seaport at that time.

​Façade: Buoyed by high-end rental developments, such as The Castle, as well as affordable prices, proximity to New York City, and a $6 million train-station renovation, this pulsing neighborhood has experienced dramatic change in recent years, with diverse ethnic and fine-dining options, anchored by the renovated, historic Capitol Theatre.

Foundation: This formerly blue-collar area is now being influenced by neighboring Rye and Greenwich, and joining the area’s large and established Latino population, a new generation of young professionals enjoy the area’s many charms, including a short commute to Manhattan; top-notch eateries, like Mario Batali’s Tarry Lodge, The Kneaded Bread, and bartaco; and great performances at The Capitol Theatre. “A lot of what people have been looking for has come to this area,” says Chrissy Hazelton of Houlihan Lawrence.

Recent Reno: Metro-North station

Trending: Units sold are up 19 percent, and median prices are up 7 percent in the last year, according to Hazelton.


Best Thing About Living Here: “Downtown, when a show is happening, it’s amazing — the energy, the activity. It’s changing the way people are looking at Port Chester; they’re taking notice of the value that’s here.” — George Ford, longtime resident


Selling Points: affordable, short commute to Manhattan, diversity, dining

Trade-off: Parking is scarce.

Starting Point: $260,000 for a 2-bedroom, single-family home

Topping Out: $5,450,000 for a 6-bedroom waterfront home

Best For: commuters, families, and young professionals 

Need to Know: The community is dense and can become congested with traffic.

Fast Fact: The village was originally known as Saw Pit, for the saw pits that were in use in the late 1700s. Logs were cut in holes in the ground for wood to be used for shipbuilding.

Assessment: affordable, urban living in a suburban waterfront setting

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