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Get Your Farm Stand Fix at These 6 Winter Farmers’ Markets

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Not all of Westchester’s farmers’ markets close down after autumn’s last leaves fall. Seek out these six, which still operate in winter, and you’ll be rewarded with fresh produce, scrumptious baked goods, skincare products, and other amazing treats.

Hastings Farmers’ Market

James V. Harmon Community Center, 44 Main St, Hastings-on-Hudson
On the first and third Saturday of each month, the Hastings Farmers’ Market moves indoors, with 25 to 30 vendors on hand (a couple more are outdoors unless the weather is truly harsh). The longest lines are always at Long Island-based Pura Vida Fisheries, selling fresh seafood. Letterbox Farm, based in Hudson, has gorgeous cuts of pork and chicken, plus divine eggs.

In addition to selling olive oil, Kontoulis Family Olive Oil makes tapenades and sought-after moisturizing facial soaps that are big with the market’s female customers. And if you just can’t wait to get home and start cooking, Kimchi Kooks has hot scallion and zucchini pancakes made with rice flour.
Go: First and third Saturday of each month, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., through the third weekend of May

Photo courtesy of Hastings Farmers’ Market

Irvington Farmers’ Market

Main Street School, 101 Main St, Irvington
On the second and fourth Saturday of each month, you’ll discover 25 to 30 exciting vendors in the auditorium at the Main Street School. Joe Tomato Mozzarella makes his mozzarella by hand the morning of the market; R&M Farms, a New Jersey-based newcomer, offers meats, 11 types of sausage, and even chicken bacon; and Teagevity stocks a selection of artisanal teas, including a Love Tea that’s perfect for Valentine’s Day.

You also won’t help but notice the nuns — members the Fraternité Notre Dame order — selling delectable Parisian fruit tarts and quiches to help finance the soup kitchen they run in Manhattan.
Go: Second and fourth Saturday of each month, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., through May

 

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Mamaroneck’s Down to Earth Farmers’ Market

Harbor Island Park Pavilion, 1 Harbor Island Park, Mamaroneck
This year, Mamaroneck’s market moved to a new winter home at the pavilion at Harbor Island Park, housing some 40 vendors on a rotating basis. American Pride Seafood sells impeccably fresh scallops, whole fish, and filets. Sun Sprout Farm grows its produce, including root veggies, leafy greens, and kale, in Orange County’s Black Dirt region, a geological deposit created by glaciers.

For those on restricted diets, there’s Pipini Breads, a gluten-free vegan baker offering breads, cookies, and more. Also check out the earthy display from Mushrooms.NYC, a Brooklyn-based indoor mushroom farm.
Go: Saturdays, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., through April 18

 

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Ossining’s Down to Earth Farmers’ Market

Spring St & Main St, Ossining
Bundle up for the winter season of the Ossining Farmers Market, which is held outdoors in a parking lot near the corner of Spring and Main Streets. It’s a small market, but each of its seven to eight vendors offers something special. Long Island-based 4E Farm provides root vegetables, small leafy greens, and broccoli for an extended season.

For meat lovers, there’s Sunset View Farm, based Upstate near Oneonta, selling pork, beef, and poultry (especially stew chickens). Wave Hill Breads is also on-site, with croissants, scones, baguettes, and traditional European-style loaves, while traditional and gluten-free treats can be found at Kingston-based Meredith’s Bread.
Go: Saturdays, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., through May 2

 

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Peekskill Farmers’ Market

Peekskill Youth Bureau, 828 Main St, Peekskill
Conveniently located right off Route 9, Peekskill’s market is easy to visit, even from other towns. Stroll among some 15 vendors, such as Mind, Body & Bath and Rebecca’s Paradise, both of which sell skincare products. But don’t worry, there’s plenty to tempt your taste buds, too. The chef behind The Vegan Shawarma, who formerly served in the Israeli Air Force, dishes up falafel, hummus, and, of course, shawarma.

Nearby, Cortlandt Manor-based Rebel Greens will cut microgreens fresh off their live trays for you. And, the gluten-free prepared foods from Senza Glutine will appeal even to those who don’t have gluten sensitivity.
Go: Saturdays, 10 a.m.–2 p.m., through April

Photo by Corinna Makris/Peekskill Farmers’ Market

Pleasantville Farmers’ Market

Pleasantville Middle School, 40 Romer Ave, Pleasantville
This popular indoor farmers’ market draws 37 vendors to the Pleasantville Middle School cafeteria. Among them is Neversink Farm, offering certified-organic greens grown through no-till, high-density farming, and Gajeski Produce, which benefits from Long Island’s extending growing season (and some indoor growing methods) to produce veggies, greens, and herbs during the colder months.

Don’t miss Edgwick Farm, whose workers travel from Cornwall, NY, to purvey goat’s milk cheese and fresh goat milk (both white and chocolate), or grab a crunchy apple from Tivoli’s Mead Orchards, which has been in operation for more than a century.
Go: Saturdays, 8:30 a.m.–1 p.m., through March

Photo courtesy of The Pleasantville Farmers’ Market

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